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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the ballot initiative process in california is so famous. i do want to say that california had a couple of controversial ones here, 1, they did not vote down the death penalty, still allowed in california. 2, it looks like they passed a tax measure to make california the most taxed state in the union. so that's controversial here in california. a bit of a surprise, considering the economy here in the golden state isn't the best. but you mention the process, the ballot process across the country. yes, definitely, same-sex marriage and marijuana both faired very well at the ballot box. maine passed it, as well as maryland and washington, all passing referendums, allowing for same-sex marriage. they legalized it again in maine, maryland and washington, and an amendment to vote against it in minnesota is too close to call at this hour. meantime, to the medical marijuana front, we know that two big states here that passed the medical marijuana were -- lost you here, montana. and in oregon, it's failing. the interesting vote with marijuana was the fact that colorado and washington allowed it
, illinois, california, and new york, the democrats are going to pick up 104 electoral college there and they did nothing there except go there for fund-raisers. that just shows you how sure we have of these states that are so blue and so red. but it's those nine states that we're talking about. that's what it's going to come down to, those nine battleground states and they are all-- with the possible exception of ohio-- all within the margin of error right now. >> pelley: norah, what do you see going into election tonight? >> one of the things i think is interesting is how much of the country has voted today before election day, the so-called early vote. it's been growing over the years. today we've seen more than 30 million people have turned out at the polls. interestingly enough, scott, the battleground state where this early vote has turned out. look at this. colorado, 77% has already voted. nevada. 72%. north carolina, 63% has already voted. in florida 53%. iowa 44%. and ohio 31%. john dickerson and i were talking about this earlier today. we could have most of the result
, a democratic candidate to beat jonathan paton. in california, the democrat there beats tony strickland. michigan's first. the republican, benishek, co mes out the victor. there are a few other outstanding ones. go to our web site c-span.org. as we told you yesterday, the state of florida had yet to be called. here is the "miami herald." we still do not know where the 29 electoral votes will go, but it has not made a difference in the overall outcome of the presidential election. back to the topic of what was your message to washington. a lot of newspaper articles this morning about the fiscal cliff. that is what faces these leaders as they make their way back to washington. here is the fiscal -- "the financial times." topping that list is paul ryan, the vice-president candidate returning to congress and has asked to continue on as chairman of the house budget committee. those are the people doing the negotiations. moving on to "the washington post." they know earlier wednesday barack obama call john boehner and others to urge them to put aside partisan interests to advance the interest
california to try to help new york clean up sandy. 69 vehicles from southern california were flown in from the west coast. they also sent generators and water pumps to help with clean-ups. the navy will be on stand by in case the state government asks for them help. and now, picking up the pieces from sandy. staten island is a 60 square mile portion of new york city and it suffered some of the worst devastation from the storm. 19 of the city's deaths happened on staten island and today, i toured some of the hardest hit areas and spoke with residents just beginning to pick up the piecing of their shattered lives. this is quincy avenue and you still can't get close to house number 845. that's where barbara and her son, christopher, barely survived the storm. >> we stayed 11 hour onss on the roof. we kept yelling help to everyone we see. nobody was coming. nobody. >> their neighborhood, destroyed. the water rose feet in just minutes. they escaped with their lives, but suffered unimaginable loss. >> we were told the next day, looking for my sister, she was found dead in her apartment -- we hav
people into jobs that are opening. there's a reason san diego, california is the human genome capital of the world. same deal, public, private, foundations, people working together. ever since the tea party took over the republican party -- >> boo! >> ever since the tea party took over the republican party, they say it's my way or the highway, we're right all the time. they've beat the distinguished republican senator from indiana, richard luger, their most important foreign policy spokesperson because he was attacked by his opponent for cooperating with president obama on national security. they're nominee actually said, i couldn't make this up, that his happiest day was when he was imposing his opinion on someone else and he wanted the people to send him to washington, so that he could have more partisanship in washington, d.c. now if you want it, you can have it. the people of indiana don't want it, congressman joe donnelly his opponent was ahead by 11 points in the most recent polls, you're going to change that. but it will all be for naught if you reward him by not electing presi
of ballots are still being counted, 4 million in california alone. sometime today we think we will be officially the winter in florida. -- the winner in florida. as of right now, total turnout and number of voters has increased in colorado, iowa, minnesota, nevada, north carolina, and wisconsin. it looks like it decreased in 35 of 49 battleground states. the total turnout may be higher in 2008 when all the votes are finally counted. as we plan 4, total minority vote share increased to 28%. our coalition turnout, women made up about the same% of the electorate as in 2008. we got if you got% of women voters. for lots of reporting about youth turnout, they continue to turn out and take control of their future. in virginia, we increased our youth percentage. in florida, boating rates increased to 16%, and we got 61% in 2008 and 66% in 2012. african american turnout and support was as high or higher than ever. in ohio, african-americans increased from 11% to 15%. we got somewhere between 9% and 97% in every battle ground state. 71% of latino vote, the highest percentage of latino v
's exhausted, understandably so. leon panetta who come phaout commutes from washington to california he wants out. he's over 70 and wants to row tire. timothy geithner the treasury secretary wanted out a while ago and was pressed to say. i would think in the case of panetta and clinton that republicans will be unhappy to see them go because they are pretty popular up on capitol hill, a lot of respect for both of them. obviously hillary clinton with the libya situation there is some criticism there, generally speaking i think conservatives have been happy with a liberal democratic president having people like hillary clinton and panetta running national security. geithner not as popular with conservatives. and eric holder definitely because of fast and furious and other policies not as popular with conservatives. martha: it race raises the questions in all four of those spots, who do you think are some of the names that we might see tpulg those spots, chris? >> the most interesting one, i guess, is susan rice,s u.n. ambassador was considered one of the frontrunners to be the secretary of state
in california. hi tara. >> i'm a big fan. i downloaded the sexy liberal tour and i'm going to go see the next show next time you're in the bay area. >> stephanie: yeah. >> caller: i have something to say about mccain and romney but first i want to thank you that you never make us listen to -- and give equal time to the dodos on the other side. i appreciate that. >> stephanie: we're anti-dodo. thank you. >> caller: i just wanted to say about mccain in my opinion he lost all credibility the day he accepted sarah palin as his vice presidential candidate. >> stephanie: can you believe he called susan rice not very bright? >> caller: wow. i wouldn't take his opinion on very much. both romney and mccain could have been serious threats if they had run moderates they used to be. >> stephanie: right. his comments about the gifts and then 47% comments before that, it goes to show you what the thing we were always the most afraid of. he's not a moderate. >> caller: no. he was faking it when he was pretending to be a moderate
society organizations which also features the involvement of the university of california san diego. working with the local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security so there are a lot of bottom-up approach is in changing the securities sector. in addition to the high level of policies that we have been discussing such as the initiatives for the police. >> okay. let's take this as our final question and then one more large question to pose to the panel before we break. >> my name is jason, an independent researcher and consultant on issues around policing and the conflict. my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will tweak it for to tunisia. i'm glad he mentioned his paper. it highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya conducting a light footprint and not the kosovo or afghanistan model with hundreds of thousands of people on the ground. and what sort of pushed the democratization and the ssr forward. so i guess the question for bob is what are the considerations to be engaged the conflict, post conflict ssr. what can
coastal town in california. he was the subject, on the fbi most wanted list and responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew where he was. it's hard to prove negatives but we have 6000 documents from the bin laden compound that have been translated. if there's there is a smoking gun, proving official pakistani passivity operations are not so good that we would not pointed out publicly at this point. >> the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no morew more than they say. but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] there is no evidence i have seen that there was high-level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know you can be a accused of and confidence in this was a domestic issue but that is a different question than we are talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence that they knew that he was there during that time. >> one quick follow up, al qaeda tried to kill general musharraf. al qaeda was at war with the pakistani state and the pak
wounded outside the empire state building. 7 killed at a university in oakland, california. 7 dead at a sikh temple in oak creek, wisconsin. 12 killed and dozens more wounded at a movie theatre in aurora, colorado. and then there was this -- >> i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands -- >> congresswoman gabby giffords leading the democratic national convention in the pledge of allegiance some 20 months after she was shot in the head in arizona. >> liberty and justice for all. >> there was one brief exchange during the second debate about gun violence. >> i also share your belief that weapons that were designed for soldiers in war theaters don't belong on our streets. >> i'm not in favor of new pieces of legislation on guns. and taking guns away or making certain guns illegal. >> but during three hours of debates devoted to domestic matters, the phrase "gun control" was never mentioned, not even by the democratic incumbent. >> how do we balance the rights of gun owners while protecting citizens from mass killings? that'
of this nation. and it holds true to all americans. from the migrant worker in california to the students here in this room and executives in new york city, we all cherish liberty. and i can't help but to feel we are among the greatest generation. [inaudible] we hold the world at our fingertips and we can change the world at the blink of an eye. to the innovation of social media we have brought the world closer together, and we've brought stories shared among all individuals. i have come to realize after having my article published in an online magazine, that to me proves to me that we do have a future. we must take full of vantage of our time in history. this is why i'm so honored to host the debate tonight with three speakers of three different perspectives and political ideology. i truly believe the discussions among these different perspectives and opinions can pay for which he american dream. all of our paths here for many years. today, we will write of our own future, our own destiny. i can't think of any better person to lead a debate more eloquently, efficiently, equally, and as an ind
yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, i'm going to be very proud to support amendment 2985. i think it has to do with our military readiness. i think it has to do with our national security. and i think the fact that we have this opportunity is commendable, and i want to thank senator udall for it. striking section 313 is important because that section harms d.o.d.'s ability to diversify its fuel supplies by developing and using effective alternative fuels. now, you know, lots of colleagues can come down here and proclaim thi this isn't important or it is important. you know what? i want to listen to the d.o.d. themselves and what they say. there was an armed forces press service news report in july 2012. and this is what they said: and i quote -- "smart investing and less reliance on petroleum-based fuels will help ensure an agile, lethal and adaptable combat force and ultimately national security. " so, mr. president -- mr. president, i was distraught when i heard that the armed services committee by one vote put in this
. because we are getting a little ray of sunshine coming from california perhaps. this is a scene of utility trucks being loaded in california on military cargo planes and being brought to the new york area. so that is the kind of thing we need to see. we are, everybody in the area will be greatful for that help. there is talk there should be gasoline trucks like that, brought to alleviate some pressure on the gas situation in the area which would go a long way to ease tensions as well. so, great picture there, huh? bill: think about that. they were taking utility trucks from alabama and driving them in here pretomorrow. -- prestorm. after the storm therm coming from missouri and other states, a thousand plus miles away from new york and new jersey. put them on transport planes. gives you a sense of amount of need even today. martha: these are the most densely populated states in the country. i think new jersey is most densely populated state in the country. it is a small state with a lot of people in it. it is feeling pretty cloud crowded. bill: you have the election in four days. unemploym
and bigger government. california's lesson, all they do is raise taxes on the rich and don't solve their problems. we don't want america to become like california. >> will liberal democrats in the house, donna, go along with the president if he significantly makes changes, cuts spending for example for medicare and medicaid? >> 60% of the american people, wolf, believes that we should raise taxes on the wealthiest americans. we've had this debate now for many, many months, many, many years on what conservatives want and what so-called tea party republicans want. liberals are going to push their agenda. they are going to fight hard for their agenda. we're not going to set aside our goals, our policies simply because the republicans lost. they lost. and it's important that -- >> donna, they still retain the majority in the house of representatives. and there aren't enough democrats in the senate to beat back a filibuster. >> wolf, we're going to fight for our causes. we may lose. we won more than 57% of the senate seats out there. i mean, we got a lot of popular votes out there. we'r
for our guest here in miami is patricia in cottonwood, california. patricia, you're on booktv. go ahead with your question or comment for neil barofsky. .. >> guest: well, first of all, thank you. that really feels great. you know, writing a book like this, it's a challenge writing about the bailout, and what i really tried to do was to make it accessible and understandable, and when i had the job in washington, special inspector general, that was the montra. i called it t.a.r.p. 101, it was put out so the american taxpayers, those paying for the program could really understand what was going on. it was the goal so it feels particularly good to hear the really kind comments that you just said. as far as the next book, i'm sort of recovering from this book. i really did it as a first time author, i did enjoy the process, and i really -- it was something that was, you know, you never know when you go on add veepture or journey in producing a book what it will be like, i am interested in writing something else, but i have not seen the topic to sink teeth into, but i want to write a seg boo
. >> the chairman of the senate intelligence committee of course, that's dianne feinstein of california, has said today that though david petraeus warks n will not be testifying at the hearings she's called for later in the week, he could be called at a later time. >> mike viquiera, thank you so much. for more on the petraeus resignation, wants to bring in msnbc military analyst, retired u.s. army colonel, jack jacobs. colonel jack, thanks for sticking around. first of all, let's start with where vic left off. what do you make of the timing of all of this? >> i don't see anything untoward about this. i think the fbi investigated as quickly as they could. i think as soon as they found something out, they talked to him. there was a bit of a delay in notifying the president. but that's something else altogether. you were asking about gen ben ghazi, do you want to talk benghazi? >> yeah. >> you've been on the ground. you know, you know what it's like to be on the ground when your intelligence is no good, i think from a military standpoint, i don't think it made any sense whatsoever to send a quick re
. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, this being the first day we've convened since the election i want to begin by expressing my appreciation to our chaplain, father conroy, for his very inspiring and thoughtful prayer. mr. speaker, we are here this week to deal with a very important issue, and i will say that we were all taught as kids, better late than never. we're here because u.s. workers at this point don't have access to 140 million potential consumers for their goods and services. and i'm talking about the vote we're going to have on so-called russia permanent normal trade relations. mr. speaker, vladimir putin is not a good guy. vladimir putin has inflicted horrendous human rights policies on the people of russia. we've seen crony capitalism take hold. and that's why it's very important, mr. speaker, that the uni
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)